Saturday, 24 July 2021

The Machrie Golf Links and Hotel Programme of Works

DesignBox is delighted to announce the completion of a programme of works at the Machrie Golf Links and Hotel, with our appointment as Project Manager. 

The Machrie Hotel set behind the 18th hole on the Links
Photograph: Alan Williams

The Machrie sits on the edge of the Laggan Bay, on the Isle of Islay.  Know as ‘the Queen of the Hebrides’, Islay is the southern most island of the Inner Hebrides.  Islay is famous for its whiskey, its environment, wildlife, and of course golf and hospitality.

The 18 holes of the Machrie Golf links with the Hotel's construction site 
in late 2017

The Machrie includes an 18 hole championship links course set into the pristine dunes next to a SSSI beach. There’s also a ‘Wee Course’ for beginners or golfers looking for a warm up. The four star luxury Hotel managed by Campbell Gray Hotels includes 47 guest rooms, a bar, restaurant and function room, three lounges, a 30 seat cinema, gym, spa, golf shop and an indoor driving range with technical suites and golf lounge. The links course has been thoroughly upgraded by DJ Russell and Edinburgh Landscaping to reclaim the charm of the original Willie Campbell course of 1891.  To support the upkeep and maintenance of the links, the green keeping team now have two maintenance sheds and a series of annexed plant facilities. 

Walking the route for the water mains with Scottish Water 
through peat bog

DesignBox was appointed as project manager in May 2013 to assist with securing consent to connect to the mains water supply from Scottish Water.  Up until this point the Machrie had operated without mains water which was a key factor to the hotel’s closure in 2011 under previous ownership. Consent was granted in 2014 with agreement for a pipe line to connect the hotel to the nearest water mains, 2.9km away.   The work involved easements across four adjacent landowners farms and was critical to unlocking the business viability of the hotel’s business case. 
Simultaneously, DesignBox was also appointed to project manage the construction of a new green keepers shed in 2013.  The original had been destroyed in a storm some time earlier. In developing the project, DesignBox ensured that all service infrastructures were upgraded to future-proof the Machrie for the programme of works to follow.  This included redirecting the overhead mains power supply to the new shed to make space for a new first fairway, upgrading the pole-mounted transformer and power supply to enable the green keeping team to manage their vehicles and plant. A series of buried ducts were installed to enable BT and water connections to the shed and a new HV mains connection to the hotel.  Circulation tracks were managed to make the route to the green keeping facilities as inconspicuous as possible, whilst maximising space for golf play at the same time.  

The Machrie Golf Links Green Keepers Shed

The Client’s vision was to create a world-class Championship Links Course connected to a newly redeveloped four-star hotel, for the enjoyment of local, national and international visitors.  DesignBox was appointed project manager for the hotel redevelopment project in 2015.  This began with a series of enabling works which took place in quick succession to facilitate the hotel’s design and procurement programme, and start on site date.  Enabling works included the removal of asbestos, partial demolition of the existing hotel and temporary refurbishment of 14 existing holiday cottages for use as site workers accommodation during the build.   

The Machrie Hotel at the beginning of construction

DesignBox project managed the design development of the hotel project working for the Client with Hudson Architects (Architects), Peter Young Design(Interior Designers), Morham & Brotchie (Oban) (Quantity Surveyors), David Narro Associates (Glasgow) (Structural Engineers), Hulley & Kirkwood (Glasgow) (MEP Services Engineers), Victoria Jerram (Lighting Designer) and a series of specialist suppliers.   We started on site in September 2016 with Corramore Construction as the main contractor, and reached Practical Completion in September 2018.  With Islay being a west coast Scottish island, logistics, lead in times, availability of specialist trades, working weather windows and accommodation were key challenges we worked on as a team to ensure progress, in addition to the normal challenges of project management.  We were a robustly positive team and always maintained progress. 
In addition to the main contract of the Hotel’s construction, DesignBox project managed the logistics to bring all the FF&E and OS&E to the Machrie, new phone connections to the hotel, a new BT data fibre connection from Port Ellen 6.5km away, and the demolition of 10 of the remaining cottages after they were vacated by the site team.  

Inspecting the contents of the trailers

Because Islay is a relatively remote location, anything required off the Island can take time to arrive.  The Machrie sought to overcome this by equipping themselves with all the key machinery, facilities, plant and skilled people required to make them self sufficient.

Vehicle work at the Machrie maintenance shed

Following the opening of the newly redeveloped hotel, DesignBox was appointed to project manage a new vehicle shed for the green keeping team which completed in 2020 and the resurfacing of their 1.3km approach road to the Hotel which completed in 2021, staged either side of lockdown.  

The new vehicle shed tucked behind the maintenance shed

The Machrie Golf Links and Hotel is a very special destination and these projects occupy a very special place in the DesignBox portfolio. The regeneration of the Machrie’s Hotel and Golf Links marks a most incredible transformation which is all to the credit of the Client’s vision and attention to detail.  I am sure the Machrie will have a wonderful summer season this year and I hope there might be another opportunity to work for the Machrie again in the future. 

Evening at the newly redeveloped Machrie Hotel
Photograph - Alan Williams


Tuesday, 20 April 2021

Tube-Hub



Transport For London (TFL) are looking for ideas to add value to some of their tube station car parks. Our response is Tube Hub; a heterogeneous network of street markets, connected and empowered by the TFL tube network. 

With a focus on local speciality trades, crafts and businesses, each market in the Tube Hub network can be a place to buy a passing coffee, drop off dry cleaning, meet work mates for lunch, rent a work station for a day, or meet friends for an evening event.  


The tube network raises the profile of the markets, facilitating access with passing trade from commuters or as a specific destination for visitors. 


We have been living our lockdown lives with ever more reliance on online services, often through a small number of well-established companies.  Progressive technologies allow us to operate without geographical base, supported by logistics that brings stuff to your door. 


It seems long ago that we knew our local high street and the small family businesses which populated it. We have moved towards a more anonymous relationship with our community. 


Tube Hub seeks to re-address this, re-uniting communities with the wealth of services in their area, supported by the robust TFL transport system, which encourages people beyond their doors and brings everyone together!  


2020 and 2021 so far have been long periods of lockdown. With restrictions thankfully easing we now have the opportunity to take back some ground on how we connect with our communities and the wealth of opportunities it offers...and enjoy life.


Friday, 26 February 2021

Playground Design Challenge

Playgrounds are an important part of childhood.  Play, exercise, seeing friends and having fun all happen in our playgrounds.  In these days of lock-down, playground facilities have never been more important for the mental and physical wellbeing of our children.  

But have you noticed that playgrounds are for kids, but have been designed by adults?  What do they know?!?  With Furzedown Primary School in London SW17 we set an design challenge for KS2 pupils (years 3 to 6, i.e. 8 to 11 year olds) to re-imagine their perfect playground: A space for kids, designed by kids.

This lock-down challenge was sent out to the kids with the following simple rules:

  • No adults allowed: Grown-ups were not allowed to influence the design.  Kid-power protocols govern!
  • There's no such thing as a bad idea.  Take your extreme, and push it to the extreme!
  • Your ideas matter.  Don't doubt your abilities.
  • Keep playing with your designs, with drawings, using colour, making models, even attempting prototypes.  See what the different media and scales influence your designs.  
Additional notes to the brief included consideration of space, place, weather, inclusivity and activities.  There were some thoughts on presentation, narrative and naming their projects too.  

Playground Challenge Brief

Playground Challenge Ideas

Over the February half term the kids set to work on their proposals.  The results were varied and exciting, and demonstrated a freedom of thought and individuality of ideas.  

Years 3 to 6 tackle the Playground Challenge!

In addition to making a novel response to the design challenge, the kids ideas often reflect personal interests and activities of value to them.   It has proven a very productive exercise which we hope we can develop and progress in future workshops once lock-down restrictions lift.  

Education note: The purpose of this design workshop is to demonstrate that we are all stakeholders in our surroundings.  Where spaces directly affect us, we can have the confidence to assess what we require, what would make a positive difference and what would make them special.  The views of children are no less important here.  In fact their input can carry a lot of value because their thoughts are often less affected by preconceptions of what should be, and they represent tomorrow's generation of grown-ups.

Saturday, 6 February 2021

One Sheet of Paper

 One sheet of paper

One sheet of paper is a very powerful tool.  It can be the vehicle to start any imaginative journey into design.  The opportunities for working with it are huge, and the feedback it gives to your eyes, hands and brain are invaluable for understanding 3D space as well as developing fine motor skills.  

The use of paper for experimenting with design is very important, especially for younger children.  It helps the mind to understand 3D space and form, and to enable the mind to comprehend objects in space.  This is a learnt skill which we tend to lose as we grow up.  Our world is dominated with straight lines, flat planes, vertical walls and standardised doors and windows.  As we grow up we become more and more used to these simplistic conventions.  There's a kind of dumbing down of our 3D cognitive skills.  Professional designers sit in orthogonal rooms and operate 3D computer software to solve spacial design issues which our minds are losing a grasp of.  Neither the mind nor the fingers are being exercised as they could be as a designer.  

But it starts with only one sheet of paper; a very accessible resource.  Take a scrap sheet of A4 and before tossing it in to the recycling bin, try giving it a couple of folds.  What does it give back?  Has something been created that you need to turn in your hands to comprehend? What space does it offer?  Placed on a table, what scale would a person need to be to occupy it?  Bring your eyes down to the level you would be, if you were that scale.  What is the light like?  How do the spaces feel?  How would you scale this up to make a full size structure?  Where would you site it and what would it be used for?  Suddenly you're on an Architectural adventure.

The list of examples below are techniques for manipulating paper which we have used in School creative design workshops.  It's a toolbox methods that can be used to investigate and progress architectural design ideas.  

Folding

Folding is possibly the simplest process to start with.  It can be as simple or as complicated as you want it to be, and its reversible.  Adding a few folds to a sheet of paper quickly transforms the material from being an unremarkable object to something that challenges our comprehension.  

Cutting

Cutting is a one-way process in the sense that it is irreversible, unlike folding.  Cutting allows different shapes and forms to be created and geometries managed with polyhedron nets or allowing flexibility in the material which was not possible before the cut.  

Adding

Adding allows paper components to be combined to make a new form or structure.   These can either be as structural rods created from rolled paper, geometric shapes combined as panels, or with folded forms added together to make larger structures such as with modular origami.  Assemblies can have fixed or flexible junctions.  As a result, the forms created can be static or flexible.  

Slotting

Slotting components together allows three dimensional assemblies to be created which can be disassembled and recreated in different geometric arrangements.  Having folds and slots at angles quickly challenges our abilities to mentally keep track of the forms that emerge, and can create some exciting results.

Drawing

Lets not forget that paper is ideal for drawing.  In our design workshops we always like to challenge our students further by inviting them to represent their 3D creations with Architectural drawings and how they would work at full-scale.  These include plans, sections, elevations, axonometrics, perspectives and free-hand explanatory diagrams.  

Fabricating

With designs developing, our workshops often investigate how the the proposals will transform with different materials, to experiment with colours, light, translucency, and the meanings and values  associated with different material surfaces.   We often look at different structural solutions, because materials perform differently to paper and card.  Here, white card models start to transform in to more complete design proposals with these extra dimensions added. 

Scaling 

Given the opportunity we love to attempt scaling some proposals up to full scale.  It enables the students to realise their creations and experience how they will work in reality.  Paper sheets and rods generally transfer into card or correx sheets and card roll centers from rolls of carpet, fixed with cable ties, rope or nuts and bolts.  

The journey of a humble sheet of scrap A4 paper to an individual and unique creation in form, space and geometry can be extraordinary.  To practice our drawing skills we're encouraged to sketch for ten minutes each day.  To practice our spacial design skills we should likewise play with those waste sheets of A4 paper before they get sent to the recycling bin.  

Credits

The work shown above was carried out in workshops at Furzedown Primary School and Graveney School in London and Hampton School in Middlesex.

For inspiration and technical reference, a lot of credit is due to Paul Jackson, David Mitchell, Tomoko Fuse, Paul Johnson, Josef AlbersJunichi Yananose and many other paper engineers.